Boundary Ambiguity Scales

Boundary Ambiguity Scales
Boss‚ Greenberg‚ & Pearce-McCall‚ 1990
مقیاس های ابهام در مرزها- خانواده
Boundary Ambiguity Scale- 1
For Wives of men declared missing-in-action (MIA)
Boss‚ 1990‚ Adapted from Boss (1980 and 1987)
Strongly disagree‚ Disagree‚ Agree‚ Strongly Agree
1.    I no longer consider myself an “MIA” wife.
2.    I feel I have prepared myself for a change in status (to widow).
3.    I find myself still wondering if my husband is alive.
4.    I continue to keep alive my deepest hope that my husband will return.
5.    I feel guilty about dating (or wanting to date).
6.    I feel I am able to plan my future without feeling guilty for not continuing to wait for my husband.
7.    I will never be satisfied until I have positive proof of my husband’s death.
8.    I hope to remarry.
9.    I think about my husband a lot.
10.I feel it will be difficult‚ if not impossible‚ to carve out a new life for myself without my husband.
11.The Armed Services have done everything reasonably possible to account for my husband.
12.I feel incapable of establishing a meaningful relationship with another man.
13.My children are able to talk about their father without becoming emotionally upset.
14.My children still believe that their father is alive.
15.My children are aware of all “the facts” and have reconciled their father’s loss.
16.My children and I talk about their father seemingly quite often.
17.Conflicts with my own parents over my husband’s change of status have presented a problem for me.
18.My in-laws do not or would not approve of my plans to develop a life for myself.
Boundary Ambiguity Scale- 2
For Widows
Boss‚ Greenberg‚ and Blackburn‚ 1990
Strongly disagree‚ Disagree‚ Agree‚ Strongly Agree
1.    I no longer consider myself a wife.
2.    I feel I have prepared myself for a change in status (to widow).
3.    I feel I am able to plan my future without feeling guilty for not continuing to mourn for my husband.
4.    I hope to remarry.
5.    I find myself wondering if my husband is alive in a different dimension.
6.    I continue to keep alive my deepest hope that I will be with my husband again someday.
7.    I feel guilty about dating (or wanting to date).
8.    I still talk to or communicate with my husband.
9.    I think about my husband a lot.
10.I feel it will be difficult‚ if not impossible‚ to carve out a new life for myself without my husband.
11.I feel incapable of establishing meaningful relationships with other men.
12.My children are able to talk about their father without becoming emotionally upset.
Boundary Ambiguity Scale -3
For Parents of Adolescents leaving home
Boss‚ Greenberg‚ & Pearce-McCall‚ 1990
Strongly disagree‚ Disagree‚ Neutral‚ Agree‚ Strongly Agree
1.    I feel that it will be difficult for me now that _____ has left home.
2.    I feel that I prepared myself for _____ leaving home.
3.    I have difficulty accepting that _____ has grown up.
4.    I continue to keep alive my hope that _____ will return home to live
For questions 5-9‚ use the following scale as a guide in answering: 1 = Never‚ 2 = Rarely‚ 3 = Sometimes‚ 4 = Often‚ 5 = Almost always
5.    Our family talks about _____ quite often.
6.    I think about _____ a lot.
7.    I find myself thinking about where _____ is and what s/he is doing.
8.    I am bothered because I miss my son/daughter.
9.    Since _____ left‚ I am bothered by feelings of loneliness.
Boundary Ambiguity Scale- 4 (BAS-4)
For adolescent and adult children of divorce
Boss‚ & Pearce-McCall‚ 1990
1 = Never‚ 2 = Rarely‚ 3 = Sometimes‚ 4 = Often‚ 5 = Almost always
1.    I hope that my parents’ relationship with each other will improve.
2.    I worry about whether I am spending enough time with each of my parents.
3.    My parents and I can solve family problems together.
4.    I find myself being a go-between for my parents (e.g.‚ carrying messages‚ making arrangements).
5.    I feel as though each of my parents wants me to be on his/her side.
6.    Since the divorce‚ I find it more difficult to talk to my father about things I need from him (money‚ time‚ advice).
7.    Since the divorce‚ I find it more difficult to talk to my mother about things I need from her (money‚ time‚ advice).
8.    My feelings about whom I consider a member of my family and who is not a member of my family continues to change.
9.    I still feel disturbed about my parents’ divorce.
10.I think about my mother and father as a unit‚ as “my parents”.
11.I feel comfortable talking about my mother in front of my father.
12.I feel comfortable talking about my father in front of my mother.
13.My family has clear rules about how money and financial arrangements should be handled.
14.When I think about important future occasions (e.g.‚ graduations‚ weddings‚ newborn children) where my parents will be together‚ I worry about how they will behave.
15.People on my father’s side of the family secretly ask me about my mother or ask me to say hello for them.
16.People on my mother’s side of the family secretly ask me about my father or ask me to say hello for them.
17.I worry about which family members I should or will be with on important holidays or special occasions.
18.My parents say things about each other that make me feel uncomfortable.
19.In both of my parents’ homes‚ I feel comfortable‚ like I belong.
20.It is unclear how the relationships between me and my extended family (grandparents‚ uncles‚ aunts‚ cousins) will be affected by the divorce.
If one or both of your parents has remarried or has been cohabiting for over one year‚ answer the following items. If neither parent has remarried or been cohabiting for over one year‚ skip items 21-25.
21.It took time‚ but now I have a good feeling about how we all fit together as a family.
22.I will always think of my original nuclear family as my real family.
23.I am confused about whether or not I should accept my mother’s partner as part of my family.
24.I am confused about whether or not I should accept my father’s partner as part of my family.
25.I am still clear about what type of relationship(s) I want to have with my stepsibling(s) or my parent’s partners’ children.
Boundary Ambiguity Scale- 5 (BAS-5)
For divorced adults
Boss‚ & Pearce-McCall‚ 1990
1 = Never‚ 2 = Rarely‚ 3 = Sometimes‚ 4 = Often‚ 5 = Almost always
1.    I still consider myself a wife/husband to my former spouse.
2.    Calling myself a divorced person feels comfortable to me now.
3.    I feel upset when I imagine my former spouse with another man/woman.
4.    I find myself wondering where my former is and what s/he is doing.
5.    I feel that in some sense I will always be attached to my former spouse.
6.    I still get my former spouse’s advice about important personal decisions (e.g.‚ health‚ career).
7.    I continue to keep alive my hope that I will be reunited with my former spouse.
8.    I continue to hope that my relationship with my former spouse will improve.
9.    I feel competent performing the household or outside tasks that my former spouse used to do.
10.I feel guilty about dating (or wanting to date).
11.I feel that I have completely recovered from my divorce.
12.I still consider some members of my former spouse’s family to be part of my family.
13.I feel incapable of establishing meaningful relationships with another man/woman.
14.I find myself asking my former spouse for advice about the areas s/he used to handle.
15.I often wonder what my former spouse’s opinion or comment would be on events that happen or things I see during the day.
16.My former spouse and I discuss our new relationships with each other.
If you do not have children‚ stop here. If you do have children‚ answer items 17-22:
17.My children and I are able to talk about my former spouse without becoming emotionally upset.
18.I worry that my children feel caught in the middle between me and my former spouse.
19.My former spouse and I agree on how to share the responsibilities of parenting.
20.My children are aware of the facts and are reconciled to the divorce.
21.My former spouse and I have difficulty discussing financial matters involving the children.
22.It feels like a complete family when the children and I are together without my former spouse.
Boundary Ambiguity Scale- 6 (BAS-6)
For caregivers of patients with dementia
Boss‚ Greenberg‚ and Caron‚ 1990
Strongly disagree‚ Disagree‚ Neutral‚ Agree‚ Strongly Agree‚ Unsure how I feel
1.    I feel guilty when I get out of the house to do something enjoyable while _______ remains at home.
2.    I feel it will be difficult if not impossible to carve out my own life as long as _______ needs my help.
3.    I feel incapable of establishing new friendships right now.
4.    I feel I cannot go anywhere without first thinking about _______’s needs.
5.    I feel like I have no time to myself.
6.    Sometimes I’m not sure where _______ fits in as part of the family.
7.    I’m not sure what I should expect _______ to do around the house.
8.    I often feel mixed up about how much I should be doing for _______.
9.    I put _______’s needs before my own.
10.My family and I often have disagreements about my involvement with _______.
11.When I’m not with _______‚ I find myself wondering how s/he is getting along.
12.Family members tend to ignore _______.
13._______ no longer feels like my spouse/parent/sibling.
14.I think about _______ a lot.
شرح سایت روان سنجی: پس از طلاق، مرزها و حدود خانواده دچار دگرگونی و ابهام می شود، این ابزار به بررسی تغییرات در خانواده، پس از طلاق می پردازد.
نخستین بار "باس، 1977" به ساخت این ابزار اقدام کرد.
اعتبار: هماهنگی درونی (آلفا) از 0.58 تا 0.75 برای مقیاس ها
نمره گذاری
Scale- 1: Boundary Ambiguity Scale For Wives of men declared missing-in-action (MIA)
1. Reverse and recode items 1‚ 2‚ 6‚ 8‚ 11‚ 13‚ 15
2. After recoding‚ total boundary ambiguity score is the sum of all individual items
Scale- 2: Boundary Ambiguity Scale for Widows
1. Recode items 1‚ 2‚ 3‚ 4‚ 12
2. Compute total score by adding recoded items and all other items
Scale -3: Boundary Ambiguity Scale for Parents of Adolescents leaving home
1. Recode item 2
2. Compute total score by adding recoded items and all other items.
Scale- 4: Boundary Ambiguity Scale For adolescent and adult children of divorce
1. Recode items 3‚ 11‚ 12‚ 13‚ 19‚ 21‚ 25
2. Compute total score by adding recoded items and all other items
Scale- 5: Boundary Ambiguity Scale For divorced adults
1. Recode items 2‚ 9‚ 11‚ 17‚ 19‚ 20‚ 22
2. Compute total score by adding recoded items and all other items.
Scale- 6: Boundary Ambiguity Scale For caregivers of patients with dementia
Compute total score by adding all items.
چگونگی دستیابی
منبع برای آگاهی بیشتر
By date
Boss‚ P. (1975). Psychological father absence and presence: A theoretical formulation for an investigation into family systems interaction. Unpublished doctoral dissertation‚ University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Boss‚ P. (1975). Psychological father presence in the missing-in-action (MIA) family: Its effects on family functioning. In Proceedings of the Third Annual Joint Medical Meeting Concerning POW/MIA Matters. San Diego‚ California: Center for Prisoner Studies‚ Naval Health Research Center.
Boss‚ P.‚ & University of Wisconsin-Madison Seminar Students (1976‚ June). The father’s role in family systems: An annotated bibliography. Madison‚ Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press.
Boss‚ P. (1977). A clarification of the concept of psychological father presence in families experiencing ambiguity of boundary. Journal of Marriage and the Family‚ 39(1)‚ 141-151.
Boss‚ P. (1979). Theoretical influences on family policy. Journal of Home Economics‚ 17-21.
Boss‚ P.‚ & Whitaker‚ C. (1979). Dialogue on separation. Family Coordinator‚ 28‚ 391-398.
Boss‚ P. (1980). The relationship of wife’s sex role perceptions‚ psychological father presence‚ and functioning in the ambiguous father-absent MIA family. Journal of Marriage and the Family‚ 42‚ 541- 549.
Boss‚ P. (1980). Normative family stress: Family boundary changes across the lifespan. Family Relations‚ 29(4)‚ 445-450.
Boss‚ P. (1983). Family separation and boundary ambiguity. In O. Hultaker & J. Trost (Eds.)‚ Family and Disaster‚ Vol 1: The International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters. Sweden: International Library.
Boss‚ P. (1983). The marital relationship: Boundaries and ambiguities. In C. Figley & H.McCubbin (Eds.)‚ Stress and the family. Plenum Publ. Corp.
Boss‚ P. (1984). Denial. Agricultural Extension Service Publication #HE-FS-2470. St. Paul‚ Minnesota: University of Minnesota.
Boss‚ P. (1984). Ambiguity: A factor in family stress management. Minnesota Extension Service Publication #HE-FS-2469. St. Paul‚ Minnesota: University of Minnesota.
Boss‚ P.‚ & Greenberg‚ J. (1984). Family boundary ambiguity: A new variable in family stress theory. Family Process‚ 23(4)‚ 535-546.
Boss‚ P. (1987). The role of intuition in family research: Three issues of ethics. In R. Garfield‚ A. Greenberg‚ & S. Sugarman (Eds.)‚ Contemporary Family Therapy‚ 9(2)‚ 142-159.
Boss‚ P. (1987). Family stress: Perception and context. In M.B. Sussman & S. Steinmetz (Eds.)‚ Handbook on marriage and the family. New York: Plenum Press.
Blackburn‚ J.‚ Greenberg‚ J.‚ & Boss‚ P. (1987). Coping with normative stress from loss and change: A longitudinal study of ranch and non- ranch widows. Journal of Gerontological Social Work‚ 11(1/2)‚ 59-70.
Boss‚ P.‚ Pearce-McCall‚ D.‚ & Greenberg‚ J. (1987). Normative loss in mid-life families: Rural‚ urban‚ and gender differences. Family Relations‚ 36(4)‚ 437-443.
Boss‚ P. (1988). Family stress management. Newbury Park‚ California: Sage Publications.
Boss‚ P.‚ Caron‚ W.‚ & Horbal‚ J. (1988). Alzheimer’s disease and ambiguous loss. In C. Chilman‚ F. Cox‚ and E. Nunnally (Eds.)‚ Families in Trouble. Newbury Park‚ California: Sage Publications.
Boss‚ P.‚ Caron‚ W.‚ Horbal‚ J.‚ & Mortimer‚ J. (1990). Family Process‚ Sept.
Boss‚ P. G.‚ Greenberg‚ J.‚ & Pearce-McCall‚ D. (1990). Measurement of boundary ambiguity in families. St. Paul‚ MN: Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station.
Boss‚ P. G. (1993). Boundary ambiguity: A block to cognitive coping. In A. Turnbull‚ J. Patterson‚ S. Behr‚ D. Murphy‚ J. Marquis & M. Blue-Banning (Eds.)‚ Cognitive coping‚ families and disability (pp. 257-270). Baltimore: Brooks Publishing.
Boss‚ P. (2002). Family stress management (2nd cd.). Newbury Park‚ CA; Sage.
Boss‚ P. G. (2004). Ambiguous loss research‚ theory‚ and practice: Reflections after 9/11. Journal of Marriage and Family‚ 66(3)‚ 551-566.
Boss‚ P. G.‚ (2007). Ambiguous loss theory: Challenges for scholars and practitioners. Family Relations‚ 56(2)‚ 105-111.
Corcoran‚ K.‚ & Fischer‚ J. (2000). Measures for Clinical Practice: A Sourcebook (Vol. 2). New York‚ NY: The Free Press.
   
خرداد 1396
اسفند 1395
آبان 1395
فروردین 1394
خرداد 1393
فروردین 1393
اسفند 1392
بهمن 1392
دی 1390
آذر 1390
تیر 1390
خرداد 1390
اردیبهشت 1390
بهمن 1389
دی 1389
اردیبهشت 1389
دی 1388
آبان 1388
شهریور 1388
مرداد 1388
تیر 1388
خرداد 1388
   
هرکه بر ضرر مومن داستانی بگوید و قصدش عیب او و ریختن آبرویش باشد که از چشم مردم بیفتد ، خداوند اورا از دوستی خود به دوستی شیطان براند و شیطان هم او را نپذیرد : حضرت امام صادق (ع)
   
کلیه حقوق به آرین آرانی متعلق است.